Our Research

Our research is organised around four interrelated and complementary themes:

  • Money, Debt and Financial Futures;
  • Government, Power and Resistance;
  • Modernities; and
  • Democracy, Participation and Public Life.
Our Research

Completed Doctoral Research Projects

Dr. Natasha Barnes (2016)
Love: A Frame Analysis – Exploring the Organization of Emotion.
Funding: University of Leeds Teaching Scholarship

Dr. Laura Cartwright (2015)
‘Permanently Temping? Learning, Earning and Precarity amongst young people in Yorkshire’
Funding: Frank Stell Research Award

Dr. Jasna Balorda (2013)
Genocide and modernity: A comparative study of Bosnia, Rwanda and the Holocaust
Funding: University of Leeds Research Scholarship

Doctoral Research Projects In Progress:

Mr. Robert Lee (2015-)
The Anonymous Function: Assessing the historical, social, and political importance of anonymity and its function in a digital age
Funding: University of Leeds Research Scholarship

Mr. Ben Hirst (2014-)
Putting creativity to work in the British art school, 1962-1997
Funding: ESRC 1+3

Mr. Jack Palmer (2013-)
What are the links between modernity and specific instances of colonial and postcolonial genocide in the Great Lakes region of Central Africa?
Funding: University of Leeds Research Scholarship

Mr. David Wingate (2013-)
Towards a genealogy of sustainable consumption: its representation and problematisation in semiotic discourse
Funding: ESRC WRDTC +3

Roundhouse Journal

Roundhouse is a student-led postgraduate journal in The Bauman Institute, University of Leeds. Roundhouse aims to provide students with the opportunity to publicize their work in an annually released peer-reviewed journal whilst developing their research interests through a series of workshops, film screenings and symposiums hosted by the journal’s editors.

Roundhouse’s main directives are student inherited research and horizontal learning. It aims to spread communicative practices in higher education, create a more flexible style of learning and directly challenge the image of undergraduate students as ‘passive consumers’.

Visit journal website